Tag Archive: book review

Handing on the gift of Rumer Godden’s lost gem to my daughter.

by

When I was seven I was given a battered old copy of Rumer Godden’s ‘Miss Happiness and Miss Flower’ for Christmas by a girl at school. I’m thoroughly ashamed to say that I… Continue reading

Thanks to Alison Steadman, I will never read ‘Pride and Prejudice’ ever again!

by

The novels of Jane Austen have been good friends to me over the years. I couldn’t count how many times I’ve re-read them. When mulling over what books to read for this blog,… Continue reading

The Literary Sidekick: always the bridesmaid, never the bride!

by

I think Francois Seurel gets a rough deal. Like most literary sidekicks, he is doomed to stand on the sidelines of the novel’s action (‘Le Grand Meaulnes’), holding a clipboard and taking notes… Continue reading

And that’s why reading Dostoyevsky is like skydiving with Walter White!

by

Some books need a run up. You know the ones I mean; the black-spined tomes of densely-packed miniscule text, heavy of weight and of theme. When I look at my monochrome bookshelves there are… Continue reading

Ingenious ways with scarves for better house-keeping and a happier life.

by

That Mrs Ramsey’s charm is universally irresistible, is hard to dispute. After all, even old Mr Carmichael succumbs when presented with a second bowl of her delicious soup. I’d like to propose that… Continue reading

George Eliot knew her onions

by

George Eliot knew people. She wrote men and women as deeply and equally well as each other. Not everyone can do that, some men write female shadows, some women write stereotypical men, but… Continue reading

Run! It’s the ghost of Anne Brontë!

by

As if one typo in a grave is bad enough, imagine five. FIVE! When Charlotte Brontë went to see her sister’s grave in St Mary’s churchyard, Scarborough, she ordered it to be refaced,… Continue reading

Zola. If anyone knew how to combine lust and public transport, it was him.

by

La Bête Humaine is a very readable classic. It has an actual plot and everything. Adultery and murder ahoy! It also has a lot to do with trains, their engineering, maintaining, driving, and… Continue reading

The one in which Thomas Hardy sets fire to a cat

by

I’m currently reading ‘Tess of The D’Urbervilles’ and it is the most infuriating novel imaginable. I keep having to take breathers and feverishly pace the room to dissipate my frustration at both the… Continue reading

Who fancies a trip to hell? – Yes, of course we can stop for snacks.

by

At the beginning of Dante’s ‘Inferno’, Dante finds himself in a bleak wood, where he feels lost, alone, and he meets some quite frankly unhelpful animals. And we all know, animals in the… Continue reading