Category Archive: history

The Reckoning – Part One

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This book is too full of information— not to mention exciting— for just one review, and I keep learning things I want to tell people, and most (all) people in my real life… Continue reading

Enid Blyton, a split lip, and the Reformation

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When I was five years old and waiting at the bus stop after school, a bigger boy called Simon (names have not been changed to protect the innocent as he was proper guilty)… Continue reading

“One bright day in the last week of February, I was walking in the park, enjoying the threefold luxury of solitude, a book, and pleasant weather.”

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(The above quote is from Agnes Grey, and true for me if February were ‘March’, and pleasant weather were ‘at least it wasn’t not snowing for ten minutes’.) I never thought I’d see the word… Continue reading

You must not read from the book!

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For the past couple of weeks I’ve been clad in a dressing gown, tripping off my nut on dihydrocodeine, and nursing a small patchwork quilt of stitches in my mouth (routine surgery, nothing that… Continue reading

The Plantagenets

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The price of living with more settled times with regards to the monarchy, is that Shakespeare would have very little history play material. Tales of Prince Phillip’s racism, Prince Andrew’s private flight expenses,… Continue reading

Big Bird in a small (monk)Fish Pond

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I’ve recently been reading and re-reading around one of my favourite themes, the dissolution of the monasteries. I actually really like monasteries, especially those that have gift shops where you can purchase things… Continue reading

Crossed Swords and Crossed Lovers – Balzac’s ‘The Chouans’

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If it wasn’t for some recent galavanting around Brittany, I can’t imagine a time that I’d have picked up The Chouans (1829) as the next ‘must read’ from my TBR. It’s not that I don’t rate… Continue reading

Well what’s one to do when Balzac takes a bath?

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The other night I’d been enjoying a long soak in the bath engrossed in my book, The Chouans , the first volume of novels comprising Balzac’s The Human Comedy. Thus far, I’ve enjoyed it far more than… Continue reading

‘Look, look, master, here comes two religious caterpillars.’

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The above is the best line, in my opinion, in Marlowe’s The Jew of Malta, and the first of two things I am shoehorning into this post simply because I like them and they… Continue reading

Comfort book-buying (because it’s less calories than comfort cake-eating)

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After some of the most exhausting and stressful days of my life this past month, up to and including 30 minutes of public speaking to a WI-type group about embalming (which is a… Continue reading