Category Archive: 100 Greatest Novels

‘I like work, it fascinates me. I can sit and look at it for hours.’

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Jerome K Jerome, and Three Men in a Boat is still funny over a hundred years later, and best of all, unlike The Call of the Wild, the dog not only has a… Continue reading

The Call *sob* of The Wild *sob*

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There weren’t many times I cried at school, I usually saved my angsty tears for behind my bedroom door, but I clearly remember crying when made to read a section of ‘The Call… Continue reading

The interesting but poorly paced life and times of Tristram Shandy

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For just over halfway through ‘The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy’ and he is less than one day old. ANd it’s not a small volume. Someone really, seriously should have had a… Continue reading

The End of the Great Escape

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While reading Angela Carter’s very fabulous ‘Wise Children’ recently, I was struck by a phrase lightly used that really dated the book and exemplified how different the world is now, thanks to technology.… Continue reading

That Pablo Picasso Really Knew How To Draw A Horse

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I love how art influences and begets more art, whether that takes the form of an overture inspired by a fairytale or a novel inspired by a painting. I discovered Pablo Picasso’s sketch… Continue reading

Big noses and deflated breasts – and please can someone get Byron some Vicks VapoRub

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I love outdated crazy medical thinking. Feeling under the weather? Let’s have a pint of blood from you and protect you from that toxic night air. Byron might still be alive (OK, not quite, but at… Continue reading

He Should Have Joined A Writing Group

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If you have ever summoned the courage to show some of your creative writing to another living person (cats and houseplants don’t count, I’m afraid) you should read about young Proust’s experience of… Continue reading

Sorry Enid, but this is what 10 year olds really talk about.

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As a little light reading, and also as it is on the 100 Greatest Novels list and I’m not taking Tristram Shandy into the bath (I might drop him and he wasn’t cheap),… Continue reading

Who the hell wants to dwell on their own conception?

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The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman, is a long old book (784 pages), and being first published in 1759, I thought I was in for a lengthy, dry, boring haul. Anything… Continue reading

Books with added guitar solos!

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Well, the book on the right does, every time I look into that wolf’s eye I hear and gnarly axe twiddling. It reminds me of a t-shirt my grandmother bought me when I… Continue reading