Skim-skimanny, skim-skimanny, skim-skim, skeree…

I enjoyed The Hog’s Back Mystery, but only becasue I read about 60% of it. If I had read every word, this would be a different review. So, it only seems right that this is a skim review.

An area of England I’m familiar with…name checks places I know, like Petersfield (got an aunt there) and Guildford (once got a car from there)…police inspector called in to investigate a disappearence…absurd amount of ruminating…summaries and repitition galore…like being beaten over the head with a baguette…she’s got a point, no one chooses to do a bunk in their slippers…I want a kit dolls’ house…I like my detectives to be cleverer than me…suspicious amount of perfect recollection by a conductor of a packed bus…lack of Poirot’s exciting sudden lightbulb… French is a mechancial copper…feeling of doing a crossword, rather than being entertained…blind alleys…vintage feel and atmosphere the best thing about it.

 

The introduction mentioned a mechanism called ‘playing fair’. I assumed it was known that all good detective fiction does that. The clues are always there, and even if the reader doesn’t recognise the significance at the time, if they have been paying attention, they’ll remember when it all comes together. However, in this case it means at the end there is another summary (put the baguette DOWN, Mr Crofts!) where each embedded clue was detailed, along with the page number, should you wish to go back and certify that there was no trickery and…well…Zzzzzzzzz…*snort*….what?…yes…review…really lovely cover artwork…

 

Mr Freeman Hardy Willis, sorry, Wills Crofts.

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