View over the top of my book #5

st nicholas aberdeen

I am at St Nicholas’ Kirk (church in English) in Aberdeen. It’s right on the main, busiest shopping street of Aberdeen, so there’s a lot of traffic noise, but still a calm, green and peaceful place in the heart of the city. It is populated by people who like looking at graves, people who need a sit down after the trauma of Primark, office workers on their lunch breaks, dodgy drunk people, and pigeons.

I am sitting here reading Elizabeth Gaskell’s ‘Mary Barton’, and it’s quite an apt place to be reading it as half the graves here feature the phrase ‘died in infancy’, as I’m pretty sure everyone is going to die. Most of them are permanently hungry, eating opium, catching fevers and working with dangerous machinery. I bought my copy in the Oxfam bookshop for £2.75, it was printed in 1924, and has a lovely printed flyleaf.

st nicholas aberdeen

st nicholas aberdeen

One of the older graves, back in 1700 when people cared more about Latin.

st nicholas aberdeen

The grave on the right is made of iron, they could be put up quickly and stopped grave robbers. Spoil sports.

st nicholas aberdeen

Such awesome names! Joseph Falconer, shipmaster, and Euphemia Davidson.

st nicholas aberdeen

st nicholas aberdeen

st nicholas aberdeen

'Hey Robbie, is this how you spell Jamaica? No? Oh well, never mind. It's not like it's cast in stone...except of course it is.'

‘Hey Robbie, is this how you spell Jamaica? No? Oh well, never mind. It’s not like it’s cast in stone…oh, except it is. Still, I squished it in at the top so there’ll be lots of room for all his family to follow. Ah, no family you say. Bugger.’

st nicholas aberdeen

Go home, tree, you are drunk.

st nicholas aberdeen

This would have been Mrs Bennett’s worse nightmare, three unmarried daughters. The struggle was real!

st nicholas kirk aberdeen

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